Storm track of Tropical Storm Isaias at 11 p.m. Sunday night.The Outer Banks is under a tropical storm warning although it will not feel the full impact of the storm.

Storm track of Tropical Storm Isaias at 11 p.m. Sunday night per the National Hurricane Center.The Outer Banks is under a tropical storm warning although it will not feel the full impact of the storm.

Tropical Storm Isaias is having a difficult time holding herself together off the Florida coast but she is coming our way. It has become increasingly apparent, though, that the Outer Banks is going to be spared the worst of the tropical system.

The forecast track has the center of the storm passing between the Outer Banks and Raleigh late Monday night and into Tuesday. It will be moving very quickly at that time so the strongest impacts will be last probably about five or six hours.

On the Outer Banks what we  can expect are some strong winds with intermittent squalls.

Looking at forecast tracks—are there are a lot of them—there is almost perfect agreement about the track the storm will take as it passes through North Carolina. Right now it is forecast to reemerge into the Atlantic Ocean a little bit north of Hampton Roads, Virginia.

Looking carefully at the National Hurricane Center area that will be directly impacted most significantly by the storm, the Outer Banks is no longer considered a likely place for the center of the storm to cross.

Potential Impacts from Tropical Storm Isaias

There will be impacts though.

Hatteras Island has been evacuated. And, although it is no longer in the cone of most likely direct impact, Hatteras Island is still under a mandatory evacuation order. The concern is, and it’s realistic, that the S curves north of Rodanthe will be flooded, trapping visitors until NCDOT can repair the damage.

For our visitors here on the northern Outer Banks—the ocean is going to be pretty wild for a few days. The Beach Road may get some spotty flooding, although it should not be significant.

More importantly, for our visitors who may be staying along the Outer Sounds—be sure to park you cars on the highest ground you can find. Because Isaias is on the inland side, the winds may push the waters of the sounds over their banks. If it does, the water will come up very quickly. It will also subside very quickly, but you don’t want your car sitting in 3’ or 4’ of water.

The weather is looking great for the rest of the week and into next week. Check out our Outer Banks vacation rentals for your next visit to the Outer Banks!